Security company, director and two officers sentenced in wake of SIA investigation

SIA investigations have realised another successful prosecution for infringements of the Private Security Industry Act 2001

SIA investigations have realised another successful prosecution for infringements of the Private Security Industry Act 2001

On Monday 3 August 2015 at Walsall Magistrates’ Court, a security company – Louis Alexander Ltd, based at the Trent Business Centre in Lichfield, Staffordshire – the company director and two security officers deployed by the company were sentenced for various offences under the Private Security Industry Act 2001 and the Forgery and Counterfeiting Act 1981.

The company pleaded guilty to five offences in relation to the supply of unlicensed security officers at five construction sites across an 18-month period involving seven unlicensed security officers being deployed on over 500 shifts. The company also pleaded guilty to holding itself out as an SIA Approved Contractor when no longer accredited for that purpose.

All of the unlicensed officers were engaged on zero hour contracts while some of them were also found to be working while using a false Security Industry Authority (SIA) licence card.

Khan William Rose (the company director) of Laburnum Grove, Burntwood in Staffordshire pleaded guilty to five offences of supplying unlicensed security officers to construction sites in Telford and the Newport area of the West Midlands and one offence of failure to provide information to the SIA.

Clement Ezeazu (an unlicensed security officer) of Church Way, Stirchley in Telford pleaded guilty to using a false instrument which he passed off as an SIA licence and also working as an unlicensed security officer on 152 occasions.

Trevor Ranger (an unlicensed security officer) of Jane Lane Close, Bentley in Walsall pleaded guilty to working as an unlicensed security officer on 156 occasions.

The Security Industry Authority is the organisation responsible for regulating the private security industry in the United Kingdom, reporting to the Home Secretary under the terms of the Private Security Industry Act 2001

The Security Industry Authority is the organisation responsible for regulating the private security industry in the United Kingdom, reporting to the Home Secretary under the terms of the Private Security Industry Act 2001

The company Louis Alexander Ltd was fined a total of £3,500.00 for six offences and required to pay costs of £10,303.40 in addition to a victim surcharge of £100.

Ezeazu was fined a total of £350 for his two offences and required to pay a contribution to the costs of £200 and a victim surcharge of £20.

Ranger was fined £150 for his offence and required to pay a contribution to the costs of £200 and a victim surcharge of £20. Ranger was also given a sentence discount for an early plea of guilty.

Nathan Salmon, the SIA’s investigations manager, said: “Louis Alexander Ltd supplied unlicensed security operatives over a substantial period, neglecting to ensure that only those who were correctly licensed and able to work within the industry did so.”

Salmon added: “The SIA’s Approved Contractor Scheme (ACS) aims to raise standards and promote good practice for the creation of a safer environment for the public and better opportunities for the private security industry. Companies who abuse the ACS undermine those very standards required of participating security companies. The SIA will robustly investigate ACS abuse. This strong conviction highlights that security regulation exists in order to protect those who use contracted security services and the general public, and also ensure the effectiveness of security businesses that operate within the industry.”

About the Author
Brian Sims BA (Hons) Hon FSyI, Editor, Risk UK (Pro-Activ Publications) Beginning his career in professional journalism at The Builder Group in March 1992, Brian was appointed Editor of Security Management Today in November 2000 having spent eight years in engineering journalism across two titles: Building Services Journal and Light & Lighting. In 2005, Brian received the BSIA Chairman’s Award for Promoting The Security Industry and, a year later, the Skills for Security Special Award for an Outstanding Contribution to the Security Business Sector. In 2008, Brian was The Security Institute’s nomination for the Association of Security Consultants’ highly prestigious Imbert Prize and, in 2013, was a nominated finalist for the Institute's George van Schalkwyk Award. An Honorary Fellow of The Security Institute, Brian serves as a Judge for the BSIA’s Security Personnel of the Year Awards and the Securitas Good Customer Award. Between 2008 and 2014, Brian pioneered the use of digital media across the security sector, including webinars and Audio Shows. Brian’s actively involved in 50-plus security groups on LinkedIn and hosts the popular Risk UK Twitter site. Brian is a frequent speaker on the conference circuit. He has organised and chaired conference programmes for both IFSEC International and ASIS International and has been published in the national media. Brian was appointed Editor of Risk UK at Pro-Activ Publications in July 2014 and as Editor of The Paper (Pro-Activ Publications' dedicated business newspaper for security professionals) in September 2015. Brian was appointed Editor of Risk Xtra at Pro-Activ Publications in May 2018.

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