Paramount Monitoring and Response Ltd director and manager found guilty of deploying unlicensed security officers

On Friday 22 April at Nottingham Magistrates Court, James Turner was found guilty of providing unlicensed security officers and other offences under the Private Security Industry Act 2001. Turner was the operations manager at Paramount Monitoring and Response Ltd. The director, James Lovett, pleaded guilty to offences under the Private Security Industry Act 2001 at an earlier hearing.

Nottingham Magistrates Court heard that Paramount Monitoring and Response Ltd provided three unlicensed security officers on contract to a golf club in Nottingham from November 2014 to January 2015. Two of the unlicensed officers who worked during this period were said to be on work experience and not undertaking security guarding duties. The third security operative was employed by Paramount Monitoring and Response Ltd, but worked on an expired SIA licence.

During the investigation, James Lovett was asked to provide details of the work experience arrangement and the third unlicensed security officer. He failed to do so, which represents a Section 19 offence under the Private Security Industry Act 2001.

Lovett pleaded guilty to supplying unlicensed officers. This is a Section 5 offence under the Private Security Industry Act 2001.

As Lovett was the director at the time, he was also found guilty of consent or neglect for employing unlicensed security officers. That’s a Section 23 offence under the Private Security Industry Act 2001. Lovett is no longer director of Paramount Monitoring and Response Ltd.

Paramount Monitoring and Response Ltd was also found guilty of supplying unlicensed security operatives contrary to Section 5 of the Private Security Industry Act 2001.

Unlicensed security officers

Turner, the operations manager at Paramount Monitoring and Response Ltd, pleaded not guilty to all charges. He was responsible for scheduling the working hours, but denied knowing that the unlicensed officers were deployed to the golf club’s contract. However, after trial he was found guilty of deploying unlicensed security officers contrary to Section 5 of the Private Security Industry Act 2001.

Turner also failed to notify the Security Industry Authority (SIA) of a previous arrest and charge. This is a Section 9 offence under the Private Security Industry Act 2001. Consequently, his SIA licence was revoked in August last year.

The case has been adjourned until 25 May this year when Paramount Monitoring and Response Ltd, Lovett and Turner will all be sentenced.

Speaking about the case, Michael Bryan (investigations officer at the SIA) said: “The SIA is pleased with the guilty verdict of the court in relation to James Turner, the operations manager and the company. James Turner has been involved in the private security industry for a substantial period of time and also prosecuted by the SIA before when, as a director of another security company, he supplied unlicensed security operatives on contract.”

Bryan added: “He continued a similar course of conduct with James Lovett and demonstrated a disregard for the legislation within the Private Security Industry Act 2001 by using unlicensed security operatives. The SIA robustly regulates the private security industry and will seek to prosecute those who choose to ignore the legislation in place.”

About the Author
Brian Sims BA (Hons) Hon FSyI, Editor, Risk UK (Pro-Activ Publications) Beginning his career in professional journalism at The Builder Group in March 1992, Brian was appointed Editor of Security Management Today in November 2000 having spent eight years in engineering journalism across two titles: Building Services Journal and Light & Lighting. In 2005, Brian received the BSIA Chairman’s Award for Promoting The Security Industry and, a year later, the Skills for Security Special Award for an Outstanding Contribution to the Security Business Sector. In 2008, Brian was The Security Institute’s nomination for the Association of Security Consultants’ highly prestigious Imbert Prize and, in 2013, was a nominated finalist for the Institute's George van Schalkwyk Award. An Honorary Fellow of The Security Institute, Brian serves as a Judge for the BSIA’s Security Personnel of the Year Awards and the Securitas Good Customer Award. Between 2008 and 2014, Brian pioneered the use of digital media across the security sector, including webinars and Audio Shows. Brian’s actively involved in 50-plus security groups on LinkedIn and hosts the popular Risk UK Twitter site. Brian is a frequent speaker on the conference circuit. He has organised and chaired conference programmes for both IFSEC International and ASIS International and has been published in the national media. Brian was appointed Editor of Risk UK at Pro-Activ Publications in July 2014 and as Editor of The Paper (Pro-Activ Publications' dedicated business newspaper for security professionals) in September 2015. Brian was appointed Editor of Risk Xtra at Pro-Activ Publications in May 2018.

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