Mechanical locks still functional

Posted On 01 Apr 2014
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Despite the growing popularity of access control systems driving the adoption of electronic locking devices, mechanical locks are not projected to falter any time soon. Mechanical locks, which are still used to override electrical ones in the case of a power failure or system error, are forecast to have a positive compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 3.8 per cent from 2013 to 2017 according to IHS. Adi Pavlovic, analyst for Security & Building Technologies at IHS comments,” Access control is driving the penetration of electronic locking devices such as electromagnetic locks, electric strikes, and electronic locks. But this trend will only limit the growth of mechanical locks in the medium-term; it does not necessarily replace them.” For many end-users, having an online electronic access control solution remains cost prohibitive, so they must continue to rely on mechanical solutions. Pavlovic adds,” Despite the cost, more end-users are seeing the value of being able to control access rights securely and efficiently, monitor door status in real time, create audit trails and the ability to lockdown all doors immediately in the case of an emergency. As a result, electronic access control solutions are still forecast to have stronger growth rates than mechanical globally from 2013 to 2017 both in terms of revenues and units. The mechanical lock industry itself is experiencing an increased penetration of Chinese suppliers into the international markets. These lower cost suppliers are increasing their market share in EMEA and the Americas which is influencing the average sales price (ASP) of mechanical locks downward regardless of rising material costs. Chinese suppliers are more prevalent in price sensitive regions such as Eastern Europe and Latin America, but are increasing their partnerships with ‘sister’ companies in the US and Western Europe. The ASP for mechanical locks globally is anticipated to decline 0.6 per cent from 2013 to 2017 as a result. Overall, the mechanical locks market is slated for positive growth in the medium-term, with strong construction activity in emerging markets and the BRIC countries continuing to drive demand for mechanical locking solutions. However, more mature market such as the US and Europe, will see more of an impact by electronic access control systems, but cannibalisation should be minimal in the medium term.

About the Author
Brian Sims BA (Hons) Hon FSyI, Editor, Risk UK (Pro-Activ Publications) Beginning his career in professional journalism at The Builder Group in March 1992, Brian was appointed Editor of Security Management Today in November 2000 having spent eight years in engineering journalism across two titles: Building Services Journal and Light & Lighting. In 2005, Brian received the BSIA Chairman’s Award for Promoting The Security Industry and, a year later, the Skills for Security Special Award for an Outstanding Contribution to the Security Business Sector. In 2008, Brian was The Security Institute’s nomination for the Association of Security Consultants’ highly prestigious Imbert Prize and, in 2013, was a nominated finalist for the Institute's George van Schalkwyk Award. An Honorary Fellow of The Security Institute, Brian serves as a Judge for the BSIA’s Security Personnel of the Year Awards and the Securitas Good Customer Award. Between 2008 and 2014, Brian pioneered the use of digital media across the security sector, including webinars and Audio Shows. Brian’s actively involved in 50-plus security groups on LinkedIn and hosts the popular Risk UK Twitter site. Brian is a frequent speaker on the conference circuit. He has organised and chaired conference programmes for both IFSEC International and ASIS International and has been published in the national media. Brian was appointed Editor of Risk UK at Pro-Activ Publications in July 2014 and as Editor of The Paper (Pro-Activ Publications' dedicated business newspaper for security professionals) in September 2015. Brian was appointed Editor of Risk Xtra at Pro-Activ Publications in May 2018.