Explosive detection dogs introduced in British airports by Government to screen cargo

Dogs that are capable of detecting minute traces of explosives concealed in air freight are now being deployed in cargo sheds at British airports as the Government introduces its latest measure to reinforce the UK’s aviation security. Free-running explosive detection dogs (FREDDs) working in close partnership with their human handlers are being used to check freight for a range of explosive materials. The dogs are being deployed alongside existing screening methods, subsequently offering a rapid and effective way of screening large volumes of air cargo.

Each animal has undergone 12 months of rigorous training to achieve Government certification before being deployed in the cargo sheds. As they carry out their operational duties, they pass through a regular quality assurance programme. The world-leading standards that have been set by the Government will make sure that a robust programme is in place which guarantees and maintains the animals’ detection capabilities.

In 2016, goods worth £178 billion were transported by air between the UK and non-EU countries. These detection dogs have the potential to play a vital role in helping to ensure such cargo is safe to fly.

Baroness Sugg, the Government’s aviation minister, said: “Free-running explosive detection dogs are the latest addition to the Government’s multi-layered approach towards tackling potential aviation security threats. The ability of these highly-skilled dogs to detect small amounts of vapour from explosives hidden in cargo will bolster our existing and rigorous security methods. I was really impressed to see them in action. The UK’s aviation security standards are already among the best in the world and we will continue to seek out new and innovative ways in which to ensure that passengers remain protected at all times.”

Dogs are already used successfully in a variety of ways at UK airports, helping police officers to identify criminals and prevent illegal activity. The introduction of FREDDs will add to this capability and provide the aviation industry with a new way in which to fight the threat of terrorism.

Responding to changing threats

Last month, the Government published its ‘Aviation Strategy: Next Steps’ document, setting out its plans for the future of the industry. This involved a commitment to ensure that the UK is equipped to respond to changing threats.

The deployment of dogs in cargo sheds is just one example of how this pledge is being met, with knowledge and expertise being used to build on the highly sophisticated security interventions already in place across the aviation industry.

While all cargo is made secure before it’s allowed on to aircraft, the dogs offer the ability to detect minute traces of vapour from concealed explosives. This provides a high level of scrutiny as well as a highly mobile and time-saving way of screening freight, 2.4 million tonnes of which passed through the UK’s airports in 2016.

The dogs are already operating in multiple airports, and more will be deployed around the country as the number of approved canines duly increases.

Both the detailed certification and quality assurance process that the security dogs will need to go through is set by the Department for Transport which will share oversight with the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA). For its part, the CAA will have a further responsibility when it comes to ensuring that those who operate the dogs do so in line with the standards set out by the Department for Transport.

About the Author
Brian Sims BA (Hons) Hon FSyI, Editor, Risk UK (Pro-Activ Publications) Beginning his career in professional journalism at The Builder Group in March 1992, Brian was appointed Editor of Security Management Today in November 2000 having spent eight years in engineering journalism across two titles: Building Services Journal and Light & Lighting. In 2005, Brian received the BSIA Chairman’s Award for Promoting The Security Industry and, a year later, the Skills for Security Special Award for an Outstanding Contribution to the Security Business Sector. In 2008, Brian was The Security Institute’s nomination for the Association of Security Consultants’ highly prestigious Imbert Prize and, in 2013, was a nominated finalist for the Institute's George van Schalkwyk Award. An Honorary Fellow of The Security Institute, Brian serves as a Judge for the BSIA’s Security Personnel of the Year Awards and the Securitas Good Customer Award. Between 2008 and 2014, Brian pioneered the use of digital media across the security sector, including webinars and Audio Shows. Brian’s actively involved in 50-plus security groups on LinkedIn and hosts the popular Risk UK Twitter site. Brian is a frequent speaker on the conference circuit. He has organised and chaired conference programmes for both IFSEC International and ASIS International and has been published in the national media. Brian was appointed Editor of Risk UK at Pro-Activ Publications in July 2014 and as Editor of The Paper (Pro-Activ Publications' dedicated business newspaper for security professionals) in September 2015. Brian was appointed Editor of Risk Xtra at Pro-Activ Publications in May 2018.

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